Showing posts with label health. Show all posts
Showing posts with label health. Show all posts

Monday, August 08, 2011

Rock Climbing as a whole-body exercise


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Kirk Taylor of Dallas scales a wall during a climbing session at Exposure Indoor Rock Climbing in Carrollton on June 23, 2011.


See a larger version of this slideshow.

Climbers get a workout and staff demonstrate additional exercises at Exposure Indoor Rock Climbing in Carrollton. Rock climbing provides a whole-body workout for participants.

Named in this slideshow are: &nbsp Tadd Jensen, Kirk Taylor, Paul Soutner, Chris Castrianni, Pat Roscovius, Kit Sinclair and Zach Marsh.

Please read "Rock climbing offers workouts for all body types" (subscription required) by Caitlin Johnson / The Dallas Morning News.


Monday, May 16, 2011

Healthy gifts


Brian Brown of Dallas poses for a portrait at Premier Park in Balch Springs on Nov. 21, 2010.



photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News


Brian Brown of Dallas plays during a league soccer game at Premier Park in Balch Springs. Sporting equipment makes excellent gifts for athletes of all ages.




Brian Brown of Dallas, left, kicks a ball during a league soccer game at Premier Park. From shin guards and cleats to helmets, a variety of specialized equipment is required for each sport.




Brian Brown of Dallas defends during a league soccer game at Premier Park in Balch Springs.





Saturday, September 25, 2010

Mass for people with disabilities


photos © Mark M. Hancock for The Texas Catholic

Bishop J. Douglas Deshotel anoints the hands of attendees after an annual mass for people with disabilities and their caregivers at Mary Immaculate Catholic Church in Farmers Branch on Saturday, June 26, 2010.


See a larger version of this slideshow.

Bishop J. Douglas Deshotel celebrates mass during an annual mass for people with disabilities and their caregivers at Mary Immaculate Catholic Church in Farmers Branch. An Anointing of the Sick followed the mass.

Also named in this slideshow are:   Maria Ferrer-Miralles, Rafael Ferrer, Juanita Hoelscher, Roy Hoelscher, Dallas Diocese sign interpreter Don Jones and Deacon Michael Weston.

Thursday, December 10, 2009

Buddy Walk


photos © Mark M. Hancock for The Texas Catholic

Notre Dame School of Dallas cheerleaders Chelsea Waits (left) and Georgi McNutt (right) play with pompoms before the 9th annual Buddy Walk at Flag Pole Hill Park on White Rock Lake in Dallas on Sunday, Nov. 8, 2009. The event benefits the Down Syndrome Guild of Dallas.


Jesuit High School head coach Bob Wunderlick (right) leads coach Luke O'Brien (left) through an obstacle course drill before the Buddy Walk at Flag Pole Hill Park in Dallas.




Participants leave the start line for a one-mile walk during the Buddy Walk at Flag Pole Hill Park on White Rock Lake.


Notre Dame School of Dallas cheerleaders perform a cheer during the Buddy Walk at Flag Pole Hill Park.


Frank and Charlotte Cherry watch proudly as the Notre Dame School of Dallas cheerleaders and sign language choir perform during the 9th annual Buddy Walk at Flag Pole Hill Park on White Rock Lake in Dallas.

Saturday, December 05, 2009

Blood drive for Fort Hood victims


Red Cross phlebotomist Mary Williams (right) prepares to take a blood donation from Joshua Shuck of Flower Mound (left) at the American Red Cross Blood Donor Center in Farmers Branch on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2009. Area residents responded to a request for donors following the mass killings at Fort Hood earlier in the day.



photos © Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News


Red Cross phlebotomist Melissa Villarruel (right) checks on Bill Clements of Irving (left) as he donates blood platelets at the American Red Cross Blood Donor Center. Clements began donating platelets regularly after the 2001 terrorist attacks.


Boxes are prepared to rush donated blood to Fort Hood at the American Red Cross Blood Donor Center. Processed blood was shipped immediately while the center requested donors to replenish supplies.




Red Cross phlebotomist Mary Williams (right) takes a blood donation from Joshua Shuck of Flower Mound (left) in Farmers Branch.


Bill Clements of Irving donates blood platelets regularly at the American Red Cross Blood Donor Center in Farmers Branch.

Please read, "North Texas blood donors ready to help" by Mark Norris / The Dallas Morning News

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

LULAC's swine flu information session


Guests are welcomed with hand sanitizers before getting prevention advice about swine flu (2009 H1N1) during the LULAC Chorizo and Menudo Breakfast at El Ranchito Restaurant in Dallas on Saturday, May 2, 2009.

photos © Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News



Mildred Freeby, a registered nurse at Mountain View College, gives prevention advice about swine flu (2009 H1N1) during the LULAC Chorizo and Menudo Breakfast.


Luis A. Salazar (right) listens to prevention advice about swine flu (2009 H1N1) and election information during the LULAC Chorizo and Menudo Breakfast.


Guests listen to prevention advice about swine flu (2009 H1N1) and election information during the LULAC Chorizo and Menudo Breakfast at El Ranchito Restaurant in Dallas.

Friday, May 22, 2009

Extreme family


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Angie Heiter kisses her husband Michael Heiter at their home in Richardson on Saturday, April 4, 2009. Michael Heiter had great jobs in engineering fields until a series of medical operations and finally a layoff. Now, the family struggles to pay basic bills.


Matthew Ortiz, 2, (from left to right) is lifted by his mother Cynthia (Heiter) Ortiz while her other son Alex, 5, plays with a ball next to family friend Diane Gordon at their home in Richardson.


Angie Heiter and her husband Michael Heiter listen to their children at their home. The family is one of six Dallas-area winners of the Extreme Makeover's American Dream Edition.


Angie Heiter gets food for her husband Michael Heiter at their home. Angie Heiter will receive $5,000 from Extreme Makeover and another $5,000 will be donated to a charity of her choice.


Angie Heiter slides down a wooden ramp with her husband Michael Heiter at their home. The family's home has deteriorated since Michael started battling cancer.


Angie Heiter kisses her husband Michael Heiter at their home in Richardson.

Michael Heiter died on May 5, 2009. Guests are invited to leave condolences and make memorial contributions.


Sunday, April 26, 2009

Free exercise classes


T. Laster of Choice Training in Plano teaches a free kickboxing exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills in Lewisville on Saturday, March 14, 2009.


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News


Faith Hugo of Plano (bottom) participates in a free kickboxing exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills. The event kicked off the "Spring Into Health and Fitness" program.



Jim Roskopf of Plano participates in a free kickboxing exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills. The classes are held in the center's park when weather allows. Otherwise, the classes are held indoors.



Elizabeth Villalba of Lewisville (center) looks for help during a free kickboxing exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills.


Sharon McCallum of Lewisville (bottom) leads a free Zumba exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills in Lewisville.


Elizabeth Villalba of Lewisville (center) learns steps during a free Zumba exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills in Lewisville.



Michael Ocando of Lewisville learns dance moves during a free Zumba exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills.


Sharon McCallum of Lewisville (center) leads a free Zumba exercise class in The Village Shops at Castle Hills in Lewisville.

Please read "Dollar Wise: Avoid gym costs with inexpensive workouts" by Elsa K. Simcik

Friday, April 10, 2009

Cycle For A Cure marathon



photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Monica Maliskas leads an annual 12-hour Cycle For a Cure marathon for juvenile diabetes research at the Frisco Athletic Center in Frisco on Saturday, Feb. 28, 2009. She cycled all 12 hours for her son. Her son Ethan Maliskas was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at age 2.

Please read, "Cycle for a Cure: Mom saddles up to benefit diabetes research" by Debbie Fetterman

People named in this slideshow include: Monica Maliskas, David Linson, Scott Levine, Susette Hill, James Archer, Wendy Shelley, Ethan Maliskas and Aiden Maliskas.

Sunday, April 05, 2009

Special Bowling League




photos &copy Mark M. Hancock for The Texas Catholic

Families participate in a Knights of Columbus Special Needs Bowling League match at AMF Irving Lanes in Irving on Saturday, March 7, 2009.

Please read, "‘Kids’ strike it big on the lanes" by By David SedeƱo / Texas Catholic

People named in this slideshow include: Amber Mullinax, Dee Mullinax, Lizzett Morales, Bianca Delacruz, Elizabeth Morales, Bill Krabacher, Mitchell Persad, Talieha Persad, Karel Persad, Emma Rose Elizondo and Ignacio Elizondo.

Thursday, October 30, 2008

Brownlee slams scoliosis


photos © Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Boyd High School basketball player Morgan Brownlee tries to find an open lane during a pick-up game after school in McKinney on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2008.


Boyd High School basketball player Morgan Brownlee makes a jump shot during a pick-up game. Brownlee was diagnosed with scoliosis at age 12 and was told she would never play basketball again.



Boyd High School basketball player Morgan Brownlee works on her free throw after school in McKinney. Since her diagnosis, she had surgery, went through a rehabilitation program and gained a rod and screws in her back. She's back on the court and plans to play for the school this year.



Please read, "Rehab after scoliosis surgery worth it for basketball player" by Nancy Churnin / The Dallas Morning News.

Friday, September 26, 2008

Peake tours VA Medical Center


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Dr. James Peake, U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, tours the Fisher House under construction at the Dallas VA Medical Center in Dallas on Monday, Aug. 25, 2008.


Dr. Itala Wickremasinghe (left to right), registered nurse Tony L. Murphy, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn and Dr. James Peake talk during a tour of the Dallas VA Medical Center.


Dr. James Peake (right) talks with cavalry soldier Daniel Connelly of Fort Worth (left) during a tour of the Spinal Cord Injury Center of the Dallas VA Medical Center. The officials toured different parts of the medical center including a psychiatric facility, which was closed following several patient suicides.



Dr. James Peake (left) has a chuckle with patient Jonni Booth Carnley of Hugo, Okla. (right) during a tour of the Dallas VA Medical Center.


Dr. James Peake, U.S. Secretary of Veterans Affairs, (left) and U.S. Sen. John Cornyn (right) talk to media after a tour of the Dallas VA Medical Center in Dallas.

Dallas VA Medical Center praised for swift upgrades after suicides by Scott Farwell.


Thursday, May 15, 2008

40-70 Rule


Mark M. Hancock / © The Beaumont Enterprise

Hubert Herndon (left) talks to his daughter Eva LeBlanc (right) in a courtyard at The Oaks at Beaumont in Beaumont on Saturday, April 12, 2008. A recent study concluded adults should discuss sensitive issues about health, money, driving and more when a parent reaches age 70 or a child reaches age 40.

For additional information please read, "As parents reach 70s or older, kids become caretakers" by Gloria Douglas.

Saturday, May 03, 2008

Dead PJs don't make deadline:
tips on cover and concealment

I've covered both hostage standoffs and warrant roundups with other shooters (mostly TV). I've also been consistently shocked by how little they knew about staying alive.

Recently, I covered a county-wide warrant roundup. We didn't know what any of the offenders had done. Considering how heavily-armed the deputies were, I guessed it wasn't helping little old ladies jaywalk across the street.

When we arrived at the first location, the deputies surrounded a house. I settled down with a telephoto lens behind a large steel air conditioner within site of the house and made myself as small as possible.

Meanwhile, one of the TV folks stood in the middle of the street with his feet planted and a camera on his shoulder. Luckily, nobody was home, or there could've been blood and camera parts scattered throughout the neighborhood.

Most working photojournalists (PJs) aren't in combat zones, but a hostage standoff or warrant roundup can turn ugly fast. At least once each year, I've needed to know how to avoid bullets. Hopefully, this knowledge won't be used. However, it's too late to figure out what to do once bullets start flying.

Don't go out in someone else's blaze of glory

The speed of sound is 1130 feet per second (fps). A 9mm pistol round moves at 1175 fps. Military-grade 7.62mm and 5.56mm rifle rounds travel at about 2850 fps. In other words, nobody is going to hear the first shot before they're hit.

If surrounded people don't want to go to jail, they may decide to go out in a "blaze of glory." If these people are well trained and armed, they're going to take out the easiest targets first - namely the TV shooter standing in the middle of the street without body armor.

While this may make our front page more interesting, I'd rather get photos of a docile arrest or maybe a tackle and arrest. Everyone lives through the event, and everyone goes where they belong.

What's concealment?

Concealment is the ability to disappear from the view of others. Most people can't kill what they can't see with a direct-fire weapon. In practical terms, it means the bad guys won't put a bullet through our lens.

To me, anyone firing live rounds at unarmed PJs is a bad guy.

Practical concealment is like a game of hide-and-seek. PJs find a bush or some other object to mask our presence. This makes it easier for us to work without notice and, sometimes, without a trip to the hospital.

Often, police try to clear an area for "safety reasons." Many of my colleagues have images of governmental authorities doing some not-so-safe things to people when they think they're out of the limelight. Consequently, it's important to quickly find concealment and vanish not only from the subject, but also from authorities.

A thick bush is the fastest and easiest form of concealment. Shadows on sunny days can work if there are no other options. A combination of the two is always good. The point is to avoid being seen. This lets us stay in the area where breaking news is happening and live to tell the story.

What's cover

While concealment reduces the risk for PJs, cover ensures reasonable safety. Cover is an area of protection. Cover may also conceal a PJ, but it's primarily a place to avoid fire.

There are different levels of cover, but there's also a tradeoff with the ability to work. We need to find something thick enough to absorb or redirect rounds or shrapnel while allowing us to make images.

A tree with a thick trunk is cover. A brick wall is cover. A concrete or steel post is cover. An armored car or personnel carrier is cover. All of these items will absorb or redirect potentially harmful projectiles. Each also creates challenges for PJs to do their jobs.

All a PJ actually needs is a hole in a cement wall large enough for a lens. Unfortunately, this is all someone with a rifle needs as well. However, the less exposed we are to fire, the less damage we're likely to receive.

Types of fire

We must choose cover based on the firepower we're facing. If we encounter a single gunman in a one-story house, a low brick wall could be enough cover.

If we're facing an incoming army with artillery and tanks, we'll need more fortification and overhead cover.

The key is to understand the weapons we face. There are two basic kinds of fire. These are direct and indirect.

Direct fire
Direct fire involves a line-of-sight weapon. Pistols, rifles and rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs) are the most common direct fire weapons. A projectile is aimed and fired at a target.

Basically, if a PJ can focus on a person with one of these weapons, that person could do the same with a direct-fire weapon. Aren't we glad we understand concealment now?

Indirect fire
Indirect fire involves using an arc to place a solid, fragmentary or combustible projectile in a location where direct fire isn't possible or feasible. Molotov cocktails, rockets, artillery, mortars and launched grenades are the most common.

These weapons give little or no warning before they explode beside someone in a seemingly "safe" environment. Indirect fire weapons are the most difficult to protect against and require solid overhead cover.

Types of projectiles

While we now understand we can face direct or indirect weapons when we get called away from the annual kindergarten parent's day, we also need to understand how particular weapons work for more unstable assignments.

Solid rounds
Most common weapons fire solid rounds. From slingshots to rifles, a solid object is hurled downrange toward a target. The purpose of the weapon is to place a single round in a single target.

As stated, these are the most common weapons PJs face. As long as we keep our eye on the weapon, and have adequate cover, we should live to tell the story.

While solid round weapons may appear easiest to avoid, it's important to understand the round can ricochet or create a fragmentation of other objects it hits. Consequently, it's best to find forward cover, but leave plenty of room behind yourself to let the round continue traveling. It sounds logical to hunker down between two walls until a round starts bouncing back and forth overhead.

Fragmentary
Fragmentary weapons break apart and send shrapnel in every direction. Common fragmentary weapons include grenades and almost all indirect weapons. The goal of the weapon is to inflict damage in every direction around the point of explosion.

Almost every terrorist device is fragmentary. The entire point of the weapon is to maximize damage. If PJs cover a known fragmentary attack, understand a delayed, secondary attack is very likely. It's important to stay low and move from cover to cover. Drop to the ground if there is a flash of light.

Combustible
Combustible weapons are similar to fragmentary weapons, but create additional problems after deployment. Common combustible weapons are Molotov cocktails as well as many military-grade bombs.

PJs are most likely to face Molotov cocktails during riots and other domestic disturbances. The best defense is to make images from the sidelines as a crowd faces authorities or another crowd.

As soon as a these devices are spotted, stay away from walls or other solid structures. The bottle can be broken against a building or tree and rain liquid fire and glass shards onto PJs.

Calculate the risks

Last time, we discussed the importance of living to tell the story. This involves taking calculated risks. When in doubt, err on the side of caution because a dead PJ doesn't make deadline.

This post explains the potential weapons we can face as we cover breaking news. While most tense situations allow a few minutes of mental preparation while we're en route, others can erupt without warning during a city hall meeting.

Most conflicts we cover end in an arrest or suicide. However, good PJs react quickly to breaking news and often arrive before S.W.A.T. teams. We better know what we're facing and how to deal with it.

Next time, we'll discuss how to apply this knowledge to survive dangerous situations.

Enough for now,

Sunday, April 20, 2008

Top SAT scorer


Mark M. Hancock / © The Beaumont Enterprise

Central High School senior Alana Akers (left) observes as Dr. Bobbie Colbert gives a hug to Dalton Kirk, 9, of Fannett in the doctor's office in Beaumont on Wednesday, April 16, 2008. Akers earned the highest BISD score on her SAT exam with a 2290 of 2400. She plans to become a doctor.

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

The Haven


A tire swing remains empty near a building damaged by Hurricane Rita at Boys Haven during a groundbreaking ceremony for The Haven medical facility in Beaumont on Thursday, April 10, 2008. The property under the majority of the boys home was sold to construct a third medical facility in the city.


Photos by Mark M. Hancock / © The Beaumont Enterprise


Allco Construction vice president Joe Ping (from left to right) and partner Gene Allen listen as Barbara E. Mlroy, exective director of the Southeast Texas Chaper of the Associated General Contractors of America, sheds tears during a groundbreaking ceremony The Haven medical facility at Boys Haven.

Please read, "Plans for Mediplex not yet in full swing" by Colin Guy.

Friday, March 28, 2008

Neonatal care


Photos by Mark M. Hancock / © The Beaumont Enterprise

Memorial Hermann Baptist Hospital registered nurse Cheryl Sadler cares for a baby in the neonatal unit at the hospital in Beaumont on Wednesday, March 26, 2008.


Memorial Hermann Baptist Hospital registered nurse Cheryl Sadler cares for a baby in the neonatal unit at the hospital. A recent study determined babies born early have a higher childhood mortality rate and are more likely to be childless adults.

Tuesday, March 11, 2008

Allergy season


Photos by Mark M. Hancock / © The Beaumont Enterprise

Weeds bloom near College Street outside downtown Beaumont on Friday, March 7, 2008. Spring means the beginning of allergy season.


Redbuds blossom at Tyrrell Park in Beaumont. The mild winter of 2008 equates to higher pollen counts and more mold in Southeast Texas. It also means more headaches for people with seasonal allergies.

Please read, "Pollen count in sneezy Southeast Texas expected to be worse than national levels" by Rose Ybarra.