Thursday, August 28, 2008

ABC news producer arrested in Denver

If you need a (negative) adrenaline rush, watch this video.

The ABC crew was legally working on a public sidewalk outside the Brown Palace Hotel in Denver. According to the initial report, big money folks were meeting in the hotel and didn't want the public's attention. (Hint: don't meet in public view.)

The cops were called, arrived and then decided to violate the U.S. Constitution. According to the report, "...the arrest followed a signed complaint from the Brown Palace Hotel."

ABC News reporter Asa Eslocker and crew handled it well considering a Boulder County deputy pushed Eslocker into traffic. Another cop puts a hand on Eslocker's throat while he's handcuffed.

I know some police officers. They're good people, but this is wrong. I hope legitimate law enforcement professionals elsewhere speak out.

The crew was legal. Their actions are protected by the First Amendment. The cops broke the law.

What's happened to this country when city and county employees willfully violate the U.S. Constitution because someone meets in public view?

Here's a link to the elected officials of Denver.

Enough for now,



UPDATE: Sept. 2, 2008
I received the following e-mail from the Denver mayor's office,
Dear Mark:

On behalf of Mayor Hickenlooper, thank you for taking the time to write. Please be aware that we take allegations of excessive force very seriously and will investigate fully and that the Internal Affairs Division of the Denver Police Department, and the City’s Independent Monitor are both looking into the incident. As soon as we know the facts, we’ll provide more information.

Thanks again for sharing your concerns.

Regards,

Office of Mayor John W. Hickenlooper

Sunday, August 24, 2008

Gordon Biersch review


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Gordon Biersch brewery-restaurant is open for business in Plano on Wednesday, July 16, 2008. The microbrewery chain also opened a new franchise earlier this month in Taipei, Taiwan.


Gordon Biersch manager Shane Jackson poses for a portrait at the brewery-restaurant.



Gordon Biersch offers a hummus and goat cheese salad with chicken (clockwise from front), a barbecue bacon burger with garlic fries and Steak Frites along with their custom brews at the brewery-restaurant.



Gordon Biersch offers Steak Frites at the brewery-restaurant.



Gordon Biersch brewer David Huls poses for a portrait at the brewery-restaurant in Plano.


Monday, August 18, 2008

Rangers rehab with Rough Riders


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Rough Riders mascot Daisy (left) shakes hands with Corban Bugg, 23 months, and his father Billy Bugg of McKinney (right) before a baseball game against San Antonio at the Dr Pepper Ballpark in Frisco on Monday, July 14, 2008.


Eric Hurley pitches during a Rough Riders baseball game against San Antonio at the Dr Pepper Ballpark in Frisco. Rangers infielder Hank Blalock and pitcher Eric Hurley are both rehabilitating from injuries.



Hank Blalock bats during a Rough Riders baseball game against San Antonio at the Dr Pepper Ballpark. The Rough Riders are a Triple-A team of the Texas Rangers baseball organization.



Hank Blalock (right) waits on a pick-off attempt as San Antonio's Josh Alley (No. 23, left) slides safely to first base during a Rough Riders baseball game at the Dr Pepper Ballpark in Frisco. When Rangers infielder Hank Blalock returned to the team, he was moved from first to third base.

Please read, "Texas Rangers to play Blalock at third" by Evan Grant.


Sunday, August 17, 2008

Terribly true view

I recently read Vincent Laforet's state of the industry piece on SportsShooter. Every PJ (particularly students) should read, "The Cloud is Falling." It's depressing. It's motivating. It's terribly true.

While his piece addresses the challenges (and potential demise) of different photography fields, it doesn't address the reason many of us are in this biz: we want to help people.

We must provide food, shelter and clothes for our families. This is absolute. However, there's a more important issue below the bottom line. I'm nowhere near as concerned about the lack of income as I am about the loss of journalism.

I understand the world has changed, but it isn't changing in a positive direction.

As the industry retracts each day, less professionals are available to find and report facts of importance to democracy's maintenance. Each day, people aren't being helped because individual journalists and PJs can't afford to follow these stories independently.

I'm not sure which is more depressing: 1) The loss of journalism or 2) Reader apathy about what's happening. After all, we work for the readers. What should we do when they don't care?

We (all journalists) should work harder and deliver what readers need.

Enough for now,

Thursday, August 14, 2008

NTTA changes to no change


Sun shines through an all-Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) gantry on SH 121 in The Colony on Sunday, July 13, 2008. The North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA) conducted a tollway tour as part of the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association's ETC summit.


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News


Soeren Rasmussen with A/S Storebaelt of Copenhagen, Denmark listens during an all-Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) summit in Plano. The summit was organized by the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association.


Guests view traditional toll booths on the Dallas North Tollway during a North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA) tour in Dallas.


Rick Herrington, North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA) deputy executive director, explains logistics to guests during a tour on the Dallas North Tollway in Dallas.


Guests examine an all-Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) gantry on SH 121 during an on-site tour in The Colony. The North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA) conducted the tour of Dallas-area tollways, which included the NTTA's new all-ETC gantry.


North Texas Tollway Authority's John Davis (right) explains sign details to Roger Anttila with ADDCO of St. Paul, Minn. (left) during a tour on SH 121 in The Colony.


North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA) employees Carlos Negron (from left to right) and John Davis explain sign details to Roger Anttila during a tour on SH 121 in The Colony.


Guests examine an all-Electronic Toll Collection (ETC) gantry on SH 121 during an on-site tour in The Colony. The gantry allows the NTTA to no longer collect cash on any area tollways.


The North Texas Tollway Authority (NTTA) displays new signs as part of a tour of Dallas-area tollways, which included the NTTA's new gantry on SH 121, in The Colony. Instead of cash, TollTags and license plate cameras will charge or bill drivers without slowing traffic.




Please read, "Officials get peek at change in NTTA's electronic collection system" by Joe Simnacher.


Wednesday, August 13, 2008

Summer school lunch delivers


Danny James with the Arlington ISD delivers meals before a summer lunch program at Las Lomas Apartments in Arlington on Thursday, July 3, 2008.

photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and Al Dia



Luis Antonio Sanchez, 1, (left), dribbles milk as Jacquelin Sanchez, 6, (right) licks her fingers during a summer lunch program. The lunch program is supported by the Arlington ISD to provide nutritious meals for children in low-income neighborhoods.


Children enjoy some lunch items more than others during a summer lunch program at an apartment complex in Arlington.



Foster Elementary food service manager Maria Fuentes wears a happy chef logo on her shirt during a summer lunch program.


Crouch Elementary food service manager Colleen Robertson (left) and supervisor Sylvia Alaniz (right) help children unwrap food during a summer lunch program at Las Lomas Apartments.



Children eat lunch in a model apartment during a summer lunch program at Las Lomas Apartments in Arlington.

Please read, "Distrito escolar de Arlington aún da alimento a niños" by Vanesa D. Salinas
(translated)

Monday, August 11, 2008

Southfork Ranch


A longhorn looks up from grazing near the Southfork Ranch mansion during a tour at the ranch in Parker on Saturday, June 21, 2008. Thirty years after "Dallas" debuted, Southfork Ranch remains an international tourist attraction.


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News


Neon lights and photos of "Dallas" stars welcome tourists before a tour at Southfork Ranch in Parker.


The pistol used to shoot J.R. is displayed in the ranch's museum before a tour at Southfork Ranch.



Friendly horses greet guests during a tour at Southfork Ranch. The ranch itself was a working ranch while the show was in production. Only exterior scenes were filmed at the ranch. The interior scenes were filmed in a studio.


Olle Bagling of Stockholm, Sweden rides a tram to the Southfork Ranch mansion during a tour.


Passengers learn the Southfork Ranch history as they ride a tractor-pulled tram to the mansion during a tour at the ranch.


The extended Royal family from Augusta, Ga. and Rainsville, Ala. walk around the Southfork Ranch mansion during a tour at the ranch.


Cyan Loonan (left) of Littleton, Mass. makes photos inside the Southfork Ranch mansion during a tour at the ranch. Now, the ranch has no residents and the interior was converted for the benefit of tourists.


Visitors make photos and move around the Southfork Ranch mansion during a tour at the ranch.


Margaret and Clifford Royal of Augusta, Ga. make photos of their family in front of the Southfork Ranch mansion during a tour at the ranch in Parker, Texas.

Please read, "Television History" by Jake Batsell
and Trivia questions about Dallas

I've also got some trivia you're not likely to find anywhere else about "Dallas."

My brother-in-law was the manager of Coco's restaurant many years ago. One day, some guys had an working lunch at the restaurant and were talking about something important.

One of the men asked my brother-in-law, "What are some Texan names?"

My brother-in-law explained he was from Chicago, but said the other restaurant employees were all Texans. He said, "Your waitress is Pam, the busboy is Bobby, J.R. is on the grill, Ellie is the cashier and the hostess is Suellen" (my sister).

A few months later, "Dallas" became a phenomenon. Interestingly, the writers decided to make my sister's name into two words "Sue Ellen." However, my mom named her after Scarlett O'Hara's younger sister in "Gone With The Wind." So, the character's name should be one word, "Suellen."

Enough for now,

Friday, August 08, 2008

Downtown at Sundown


photos &copy Mark M. Hancock and The Dallas Morning News

Jamie (left) and Tyke Posey (right) watch performers and shoppers on 15th Street from the rooftop patio of Gregory's Restaurant during the Downtown At Sundown series in Plano on Saturday, June 14, 2008.


Fallon Franklin with the Austin-based band Blake and Fallon performs during the Downtown At Sundown series. The event features concerts, food vendors, an art walk and extended shopping.



Shoppers browse on 15th Street during Downtown At Sundown. The series was scheduled for the 2nd Saturday of each month, but the series was abruptly halted after this evening. Officials sited a slow economy and low turnout as reasons for halting the monthly celebration.


Bryan Padmore of Irving (left) talks with his sister Lynda James of Paramount, Calif. (right) during the Downtown At Sundown series.


Jerry Rizzi of Plano (left) talks with his son Benjamin, 7, (right) as they reflect in a storefront mirror during the Downtown At Sundown series.



Ronnie (left) and Barbara Richardson (right) of Lewisville stroll down 15th Street during Downtown At Sundown.


Roy Brown of Plano (left) and Martin Bowers of Dallas (right) talk and waive flies away from their beers outside Jorg's Cafe Vienna restaurant on 15th Street during Downtown At Sundown.


Brent Poe (center) plays guitar as Plano-based Scat Creek performs during Downtown At Sundown.


Devin Evans, 3, of Plano dances to the sounds of Scat Creek during the Downtown At Sundown series on 15th Street in Plano.



Please read, "Downtown Plano finds new life" and "Downtown Plano festivals canceled abruptly" by Annette Nevins.

Thursday, August 07, 2008

Tropical Storm Edouard hits


A monument to the victims of the Storm of 1900 stands on the Galveston Sea Wall as swimmers mock Tropical Storm Edouard in Galveston on Tuesday, Aug. 5, 2008. The storm's eye came ashore near High Island, Texas in Galveston County.

photos &copy Mark M. Hancock / ZUMA



Swimmers mock Tropical Storm Edouard in Galveston. Some flooding is expected throughout the region as the storm moves further inland.


Many businesses remain closed as Tropical Storm Edouard blows through Galveston.


The Robert C. Lanier ferry of the Texas Department of Transportation's fleet continues operations across the Galveston Bay during Tropical Storm Edouard.


Flags struggle to stay attached in Tropical Storm Edouard's winds at an RV Park near Rollover Pass in Gilchrist.


Gulls fly backwards in Tropical Storm Edouard's winds as an RV Park near Rollover Pass floods in Gilchrist.


Carol Vidrine holds her head as several feet of water flood her home in Gilchrist during Tropical Storm Edouard.


A beach house is isolated by floodwater as Tropical Storm Edouard continues in Gilchrist.


Wooden lawn objects and a dock wash through a Gilchrist neighborhood during Tropical Storm Edouard.


Gilchrist neighbors Curtis Morgan (left) and P.J. Vidrine (right) swap tales during the tail end of Tropical Storm Edouard.


Timmy Daigle rides an all-terrain vehicle through his neighborhood during Tropical Storm Edouard in Gilchrist.


Gilchrist neighbors P.J. Vidrine (left) and Curtis Morgan (right) examine wreckage from a beach house balcony during the tail end of Tropical Storm Edouard.


Timmy Daigle (bottom) checks on his neighbors Carol Vidrine (left) and her mother Juanita Hall (right) during Tropical Storm Edouard in Gilchrist.


Curtis Morgan sits on the side of his hot tub and waits for waters to recede during Tropical Storm Edouard in Gilchrist.


Entergy employees Terry Phillips (left) and Alvin Sullivan (right) work to restore power during Tropical Storm Edouard in High Island. Thousands of residents were left without power in Jefferson and Chambers Counties. The storm's eye came ashore near High Island, Texas.


Please also see Calm before Edouard.