Monday, May 28, 2007

Bolivar batteries

A tour bus passes the retired Bolivar Lighthouse on Wednesday, May 23, 2007. The lighthouse is made of iron and was completed in 1872. During the Great Storm of 1900, the lighthouse saved keeper Harry Claiborne, his family and 125 people who took shelter in it. More than 6,000 people died across the bay in Galveston during the storm.

Photos by Mark M. Hancock / © The Beaumont Enterprise


Battery 236 remains chained shut to Fort Travis Park visitors at the tip of the Bolivar Peninsula. The batteries prevented Union forces from entering the Galveston bay system.


Battery Ernst remains off limits to Fort Travis Park visitors at the tip of the Bolivar Peninsula. The first military structure was built on the site in 1820 to protect the Galveston bay system from invaders.


The north entrance to Battery 236 remains chained shut to Fort Travis Park visitors at the tip of the Bolivar Peninsula. The batteries were available for residents needing shelter from hurricanes during the first half of the last century.


This is the final set of a three-part series on the Bolivar Peninsula preparing for its summer season. Please also see Bolivar beaches and Bolivar business. Please also watch the entire slide show. It lasts one minute.

3 comments:

Christina Kho said...

Hi, great pictures. I am a student at the University of San Francisco and I'm writing an essay on the ethics of photojournalism. I was wondering if you could take some time to answer a few questions that I have e-mailed you. It would help me out so greatly. Thank you.

Mark M. Hancock said...

Done. :-)

cehwiedel said...

Cool pix & info on the hurricane-related past of the lighthouse and batteries. I have included the post in today's edition of the "Carnival of Hurricane Relief." See:

http://www.cehwiedel.com/cohr/